Talk:Leon

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(Leon-ness)
(Taylor Series)
 
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: Er, I meant Math.exp()...  --[[User:Darkcanuck|Darkcanuck]] 15:54, 3 June 2009 (UTC)
 
: Er, I meant Math.exp()...  --[[User:Darkcanuck|Darkcanuck]] 15:54, 3 June 2009 (UTC)
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:: Use the Taylor series 1 + x/1! + x^2 / 2! + x^3 / 3!... to calculate e^x, the natural exponent.  You can Tailor (ha) the accuracy to whatever you want depending on speed. --[[User:Miked0801|Miked0801]] 23:21, 1 February 2010 (UTC)

Latest revision as of 23:21, 1 February 2010

When I saw the name, Bladerunner naturally popped into my mind. Ironically Leon was great at 1-on-1 but didn't do so well against two opponents. -- Martin

  • True, but I think that things would have been different if no guns were involved. :) -- Darkcanuck

The first thing I thought about when reading the name, was the film about the simple Italian soul Leon who was a unbelievable good hitman. How taking care of the neighbour girl fits into Robocode, I haven't figured out yet. -- GrubbmGait

  • Well, there were a lot of melee battles, but they tended to be 'everybody vs. Leon' rather than a free-for-all. Candidate for best films of Reno, Oldman, and Portman, all in one, imo. -- Martin
  • Wow, it would take a really really good bot to be named after "the professional". -- Darkcanuck
When your tank can get close enough to use a knife, you can call it thus... -- Martin

[edit] Quick Question

Did you try Rednaxela's FastMath class? It may save you a couple of ticks. --Jacob Litewski 15:22, 3 June 2009 (UTC)

Some day I'll integrate that. Do you find Leon slow? What I really need is a fast replacement for Math.pow() -- it's used heavily in my neural networks and reinforcement learner. But in any case Leon needs a complete overhaul for version 2.0 anyway... --Darkcanuck 15:39, 3 June 2009 (UTC)
Er, I meant Math.exp()... --Darkcanuck 15:54, 3 June 2009 (UTC)
Use the Taylor series 1 + x/1! + x^2 / 2! + x^3 / 3!... to calculate e^x, the natural exponent. You can Tailor (ha) the accuracy to whatever you want depending on speed. --Miked0801 23:21, 1 February 2010 (UTC)
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